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Race and the Wild West

Sarah Blair Bickford was born a slave in eastern Tennessee in 1852, the exact date of her birth is unknown. Her childhood is linked to some cruel conditions although according to the author’s research, Sarah had the opportunity to have some training and experiences other slave girls may not have had. She learned to read by attending church with her owner. After the Civil War was over, the country was being consumed by feelings of racism. When other African Americans thought about their future and opportunities they selected Montana as their future home. For unknown reasons, Sarah decided to join the group. She was eight years old and considered as mulatto. There was another girl named Sarah, who was three. It is unclear which Sarah was the person of the intense study and this book. After research and the passage of time, it is believed the three year old Sarah is the subject.

America’s playbook hard to stop

Think of the longest winning streaks, such as the New York Yankees, Lombardi’s Packers and the Boston Celtics. They don’t even come close to Uncle Sam’s of 75 years after WWII. We designed a system to prevent massive world wars, promote democracy and open trading systems along with trying to improve the living conditions of the most destitute. Along the way trying to prove that a mixed capitalistic system is better than totalitarianism.

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